Blessings and Milkshakes

Categories: B-shul, Religious School
 

Blessings are like a stop sign to remind us to slow down and thank God.  Throughout the year in Bshul (cooking class) students have learned the blessings for every food group.  I introduced the hand-washing blessing, Yadiim, and repeat it at the beginning of every cooking lesson.  This keeps us holy and sanitary! For Shabbat…

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Jenna’s Squad Gets Crafty

Categories: B-shul, Religious School
 

Jenna’s Squad got crafty this month!  First they decorated triangle-shaped Rice Krispie Treats for a gluten-free mishloach manot treat (see directions below.)  Then they decorated masks with feathers and gems.   This 7th grade group of girls is all ready for Purim! Ingredients Homemade Rice Krispie Treats cut into triangles Lollipop sticks 15 oz bar of…

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Pareve Hamantaschen Recipe

Categories: B-shul, Religious School
 

In Bshul our students learn the basics about kashrut.  Foods such as vegetables, fruit, grains, nuts and fish are considered pareve or neutral.  When baking sweets for a chicken Dinner on Shabbat, margarine or oil is used to keep dairy and meat separate.  My friend Ilene uses Crisco for baking, insisting it makes her pareve…

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Banana Bread for Tu Bishvat

Categories: B-shul, Religious School
 

Tu Bishvat occurs on the fifteenth day of the Hebrew month of Shevat.  Even though it is winter here in Pittsburgh, it is the season when the earliest blooming trees in Israel begin a new fruit bearing cycle.  A popular nickname for this holiday is “Rosh Hashanah La Ilanot” or New Year of the Trees.…

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Sephardic Hanukkah Donuts

Categories: B-shul, Religious School
 

Hanukkah, also known as the festival of lights, is a celebration of freedom focusing on a miracle. After the army of Antiochus IV (Syria) had been driven from the Temple, the Jews, led by the Maccabee family, discovered that all of the ritual olive oil had been desecrated. A single container sealed by the High Priest, with enough…

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Tikkun Olam: Gabriel Project Mumbai

Categories: B-shul, Religious School
 

The Ilanot class, led by Morah Mollie, is learning about three worldwide tikkun olam projects, one of which is Gabriel Project Mumbai (GPM).  Founded in 2012 by former hi-tech executive Jacob Sztokman turned social entrepreneur, GPM is built on a vision of changing the lives of children in Mumbai’s slums through literacy and hunger relief…

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MITZVOT: Deeds of Loving Kindness

Categories: B-shul, Religious School
 

On April 30th,  Morah Mollie Neuman and I led the Shorashim class and their families in a hands-on educational program about “Mitzvot” or Deeds of loving Kindness. We partnered with the Dream Center of Monroeville whose mission is to directly impact the issues that afflict Pittsburgh communities by reconnecting people to God and a community of…

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Sephardic Quinoa for Pesach

Categories: B-shul, Religious School
 

My cousin Lili, a native of Peru, introduced me to quinoa many years ago (recipe below.)  According to Wikipedia, this ancient grain was domesticated 3,000 to 4,000 years ago.  It has been an important staple in the Andean cultures where the plant is indigenous but until recently it was relatively obscure to the rest of…

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I’m Bringing Kichel Back

Categories: B-shul, Religious School
 

On March 6th, this squad of lovely sixth graders baked Kichel (recipe below) and enjoyed a tea party! This popular Jewish and Israeli sweet cracker or cookie is made with egg and sugar rolled out flat and cut into rectangles then twisted into a bow tie shape. Kichel (plural kichlach) is a Yiddish word meaning…

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No more crying over frying

Categories: B-shul, Religious School
 

I can’t wait to hand grate potatoes for latkes said no one EVER! This recipe is dedicated to all my followers who are short on time and/or don’t have a food processor to grate potatoes.  I also broke it down to an individual portion so ANYONE can make lakes ANYTIME! (Howard Shirey-no more desperate requests…

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Blessings and Milkshakes

Blessings are like a stop sign to remind us to slow down and thank God.  Throughout the year in Bshul (cooking class) students have learned the blessings for every food group.  I introduced the hand-washing blessing, Yadiim, and repeat it at the beginning of every cooking lesson.  This keeps us holy and sanitary! For Shabbat…

Read More
Read more

Jenna’s Squad Gets Crafty

Jenna’s Squad got crafty this month!  First they decorated triangle-shaped Rice Krispie Treats for a gluten-free mishloach manot treat (see directions below.)  Then they decorated masks with feathers and gems.   This 7th grade group of girls is all ready for Purim! Ingredients Homemade Rice Krispie Treats cut into triangles Lollipop sticks 15 oz bar of…

Read More
Read more

Pareve Hamantaschen Recipe

In Bshul our students learn the basics about kashrut.  Foods such as vegetables, fruit, grains, nuts and fish are considered pareve or neutral.  When baking sweets for a chicken Dinner on Shabbat, margarine or oil is used to keep dairy and meat separate.  My friend Ilene uses Crisco for baking, insisting it makes her pareve…

Read More
Read more